Weekly Exhibit

Another nameplate this week. This one is from a contractor’s locomotive used on improvement works for the Lake Vyrnwy reservoir system which supplied water to Liverpool. Prior to World War II, a number of both steam and diesel Orenstein and Koppel locomotives were imported into the UK from Germany. The plate shown is from Orenstein and Koppel locomotive works no.12242 of 1930.

Following completion of the improvement works, this 3ft gauge locomotive was used on other contracts and eventually was sold to the Piel and Walney Gravel Co. on Walney Island near Barrow-in-Furness. The line at Walney Island closed in 1962 and the locomotive was scrapped.

Weekly Exhibit

A nameplate from Sentinel locomotive No.7701, built in 1927, which worked at the London Brick Company at Farcett, Peterborough. It was named “Nutty” after the driver and fitter “Nutty” Rowell who kept the loco in service for 30 years. The locomotive is currently on loan to the Leighton Buzzard Light Railway, where it is on display.

Weekly Exhibit

Two objects this week, albeit connected.

Bagnall locomotive works no.2062, an 0-4-0ST, was used at Briton Ferry Iron Works on the 2ft 4½in gauge system. The locomotive carried the nameplate ‘B.F.W.No.5’.

Weekly Exhibit

The North Wales Narrow Gauge Railways used a system of train staff and tickets for controlling its single lines. McKenzie and Holland provided signalling equipment including the Wise’s Patent Train Staff shown here.

The example in our collection is for the section from Tryfan Junction to Waenfawr. The staff houses two metal tickets at each end, which are released by a key.

Weekly Exhibit

The museum has several recordings of the Revd. Awdry’s Railway Series stories read by Johnny Morris, which were released by Delysé.

DEL153, released in 1966, has two stories which were included in Book 7, ‘Toby the Tram Engine’. The second tells the tale of Mrs Kyndley, who was bed-bound at the time, and saw a landslide on the adjacent railway line. She managed to attract the attention of Thomas and his train, and prevented him from running into the landslide.

As a thank you, she had a visit on Christmas Day when the line was able to reopen. The Fat Controller and friends brought a number of presents, and amongst these were tickets to Bournemouth, where she was able to recuperate.

Weekly Exhibit

A reminder of the Southwold Railway in East Anglia. This 3ft gauge railway connected the town of Southwold with the Great Eastern main line railway at Halesworth. The plaque which includes a section of rail, commemorates the line which opened in 1879, closing 50 years later in 1929.

A postcard was also produced marking the closure of the line. It shows the locomotive Southwold with its train at Wenhaston Station.

The Southwold Railway Trust is working on preserving and reopening parts of the railway.

Weekly Exhibit

Another recent gift of a model to the museum is this 7mm scale model of the Corris Railway station. The model was built by Tony Hill, and depicts the station as it was about 1930. Unlike most British narrow gauge railway stations, this one sported an overall roof. Attached to the passenger facilities was a two road carriage shed. The picture shows Tony with the model on display.

The main buildings of Corris station were demolished in 1968, leaving only the adjacent railway stable block standing. This currently houses the Corris Railway Museum. The Corris Railway are currently building a new station at Corris, which although to a new design, due to space limitations, will include an overall roof to give a flavour of what was once there.

Weekly Exhibit

A recent gift to the museum is a 71/4 in gauge model of Talyllyn Railway van 146 built by Viv Thorpe. The full size version is currently being restored by the Thursday working party group.

Weekly Exhibit

The four foot gauge Padarn Railway ordered three new locomotives in the 1880/1890s to replace the originals. One of these held the distinction of carrying a nameplate incorporating the rare use of a diphthong. The Hunslet Engine Co. supplied works no.410 in 1886, and was named ‘Pandora’. In 1909, the name was changed to ‘Amalthæa’, and a new nameplate with ornate lettering was cast at the quarry workshops. The name originates in Greek mythology as the foster mother of the god Zeus. The locomotive was scrapped in 1963, together with the other two sister engines.

Weekly Exhibit

As the Talyllyn Railway’s Locomotive No.4 centenary draws to a close, another object connected with the locomotive.

While most Talyllyn steam locomotives only carry a cast nameplate, number plates are sometimes used for special occasions. Although not historically correct, locomotive No.4 was painted in Great Western Railway livery to represent what the locomotive might have looked like while on the Corris Railway, during the GWR ownership period. This included a GWR style number plate. In reality, the GWR altered the original works plate to include the number 4 as featured earlier in the year.