Weekly Exhibit

To celebrate 50 years of the North British Locomotive Company, the company issued a book outlining the history of the company and its earlier constituent companies.

Weekly Exhibit

On 14th May 2011, a shovel commemorating the return of Talyllyn Railway locomotive Dolgoch to service with a new boiler was presented by the Severn Valley Railway, who had built the boiler. The shovel is engraved “Dolgoch SVR”

Sixty years earlier, Dolgoch had been the only serviceable locomotive on the railway and was used to haul the first train of the railway preservation era.

Weekly Exhibit

In contrast to the Isle of Man Railway signal windlass featured last week, the Manx Northern Railway used a compensated signal lever patented by Stevens & Son. The design automatically allowed for expansion and contraction of the signal wire. The weight on the lever was free to slide keeping a constant tension on the wire until the lever was operated when the weight locked in position.

Weekly Exhibit

An Isle of Man Railway signal windlass made by A. Linley and Company; Birmingham. The windlass wound a chain connected to the signal wire, round a drum fitted with a ratchet pawl to hold the tension.

Weekly Exhibit

To commemorate St George’s Day, a Dinorwic Quarry wooden pattern for the nameplate “George”. The nameplate was carried by a Hunslet Engine Company 0-4-0ST, works number 184 of 1877. The locomotive was later renamed Minstrel Park, and was withdrawn around 1920.

Weekly Exhibit

From sixty years ago, the Talyllyn Railway Easter and Spring timetable. The Friday service provided an opportunity for those living in the valley to have a couple of hours at Tywyn on its weekly Market Day.

Weekly Exhibit

The Official Opening of the Teifi Valley Railway took place this day in 1986. The ticket shown was issued for this event. The 2ft gauge railway was built on the trackbed of part of the former standard gauge line from Carmarthen to Newcastle Emlyn. The railway went through a difficult period in 2014, with part of the line replaced by a road-train, but is now operating again from Henllan to Pontprenshitw.

Weekly Exhibit

A selection of track components from the Croesor Tramway. The horse-drawn tramway used chaired T-section rails, mounted on wooden sleepers.

The southern three miles of the tramway were relaid in heavier rail when they became part of the Welsh Highland Railway in 1922.

Weekly Exhibit

A Festiniog Railway cast iron wagon number plate. The type of wagon which carried this number is unknown.

Weekly Exhibit

From our ticket collection, a residents’ ticket for the 3ft 6in gauge Great Orme Railway. After a serious accident in 1932, the Great Orme Tramway at Llandudno was sold to a new owner the Great Orme Railway Company. In 1949 the local council took over ownership, and in 1977 the name reverted to the original Great Orme Tramway.